How to write an Elevator Pitch in 15 minutes

Are you an introvert?

Does the thought of talking about yourself give you the heebie-jeebies?

Or maybe you’re the life of the party and everyone you meet becomes a friend.

Whatever your personality, telling your story directly – in the form of an elevator pitch – is the best thing that can happen for your business.

(Why?)

(And where does the elevator come in?)

Let’s dive in to learn more.

How to write an irresistible elevator pitch for your business – in 15 minutes

how to write an elevator pitch

What is an elevator pitch?

The name comes from this situation – imagine you just got onto an elevator. There, in front of you, is your ideal prospect.

Your dream investor.

Your ideal client.

The perfect partner.

The editor of the publication where you’ve been dying to get featured.

What do you say to them in that short elevator ride to get them interested in you and your business?

In other words: an elevator pitch is the simple, concise version of a business pitch.

Learn why an Elevator Pitch is important – and exactly what you should say to your network.

how to write an elevator pitch

1. Set the stage

This is where you talk about the who and the why.

If you’re a solopreneur, introduce yourself. If you’re running a start-up, introduce your company.

Then, talk about your why. Why you started your business.

Here’s a (fictitious!) example:

Hi, I’m Sophie. I runBooksForHer.com, a subscription book box for girl bosses. We curate the kind of books that I wish someone had recommended to me when I first started out as a self-taught entrepreneur.

2. Time for details

Here’s where you flesh things out. Bring in some details. Add credentials, if you have any.

Metrics, social proof, initial funding numbers—whatever fits the audience in front of you.

If we continue with our example, if Sophie was speaking to a potential employee, she’d say something like: We were ranked second on the list of 5 best workplaces in the state by The Daily Breakfast Show.

If she was talking to an investor, she might say: Last year, we raised seed funding of  $500,000. Our current annual revenue is $1 million.

Remember, always tweak your story to fit your audience.

3. Answer the most important question

Now’s your time to shine. Help your audience see why they need you.

This is where you talk about the benefits your company can bring to your ideal customer. Or a new employee. Or an angel investor.

This works best when combined with a call to action, which we’ll see in the next section.

4. Finish with a strong call to action

End your pitch with a clear idea of what you want your audience to do next. Don’t be shy. If you don’t ask for what you want, you’re never going to get it.

Continuing with our same example, if Sophie was recruiting, she’d say: If you’re looking for a career that builds up other women, come check out our office and see if we’d be a good fit!

If Sophie was talking to a blogger in the entrepreneurship or feminist spaces, she could say: We’re a great example of a local business that’s run by a lady boss—and helps other girl bosses. Women building up other women. Does this sound like a good fit as a story for your blog?

If it was an investor, she might say: We’re looking for investors for our second round of funding. Does this sound like something you’d be interested in?

Put it all together

For the potential employee:

Hi, I’m Sophie. I run BooksForHer.com, a subscription book box for girl bosses. We curate the kind of books that I wish someone had recommended to me when I first started out as a
self-taught entrepreneur. We were ranked second on the list of 5 best workplaces in the state by The Daily Breakfast Show. If you’re looking for a career that builds up other women, come check out our office and see if we’d be a good fit!

For the blogger/journalist:

Hi, I’m Sophie. I run BooksForHer.com, a subscription book box for girl bosses. We curate the kind of books that I wish someone had recommended to me when I first started out as a
self-taught entrepreneur. BooksForHer has been featured on the This Night show as a great example of a local business that’s run by a lady boss—and helps other girl bosses. Women building up other women. Would this be a good story for your blog?

For the investor:

Hi, I’m Sophie. I run BooksForHer.com, a subscription book box for girl bosses. We curate the kind of books that I wish someone had recommended to me when I first started out as a
self-taught entrepreneur. Last year, we raised seed funding of $500,000. Our current annual revenue is $1 million. We’re looking for investors for our second round of funding. Does this sound like something you’d be interested in?

There you go.

The time you invest in creating a great pitch will pay for itself in business opportunities.

Final thoughts

Opportunities: Think about where else you can use your pitch.

Consider getting it printed on the back of your business card, use it as your bio on social media.

You could even use it on your website as a personal introduction.

Plant a hook: Always create opportunities for conversation down the road.

And make sure you find out how your new contact prefers to communicate.

Everyone has an e-mail address, for instance, but many people still either don’t bother or don’t have time to check it.

Are you already using an elevator pitch? Where are you using it? Let me know in the comments and I’ll help you perfect your pitch!

Want to write your own Elevator Pitch in 15 minutes? Download this free template to craft an irresistible elevator pitch that you can use in any situation!

Leave a reply

1 Shares
Tweet
Share
Pin1
Share